Digital Literacy: Communication

Digital Literacy is often defined as many things:

Most of these fall within the categories defined here under 21st century learning as well:

 

But I’ve become interested in the Communication facet the most. At my job we use Slack to communicate. One thing that makes slack so powerful are the integrations it has – and the ability to ignore things you don’t need to see and bring to your attention what you do. EG: whenever pull requests are made on github there’s a channel to see those without having to go to a separate webpage… web meetings can now be started straight from slack… there are bot integrations to find images and other information straight from slack as well. (although to be honest usually these are more fun than anything else).

Separately, Social Media is becoming more and more interconnected with hashtags mainstream and even on Facebook. Instant Video with Facebook Live and Twitter’s Periscope, not to mention Snapchat is truly revolutionizing the scope of what can be seen and when. Our students growing up today will never understand when one only saw video of the worlds events on television at a set time and channel. (Eg the 90’s and before!).

One thing I constantly am trying to convince the teachers in my Fresno Pacific classes is the changing nature of communication both professionally and with students – and how we need to not necessarily always be trying out the latest fad, but be thinking about how we can use the latest tools for our own educational needs. Example: Live Video (Periscope, Facebook) means I can watch a concert for free via someone’s phone… or learn from someone presenting at a conference (given they are ok with it). Or why not broadcast my college course classes live if it’s something that might be useful to others? These issues haven’t been fully explored (and if you read this Angel or Jeanne, I haven’t done that!) but should be… the age of instant knowledge has been upon us, and in the past couple of years instant video and augmented reality have arrived as well. There are privacy implications as well as amazing use cases for this.

For me personally, I learn a lot on twitter when people share ideas. I don’t think I would know about Hyperdocs without Twitter as an example! I see the idea of personalized PD coming soon as social networks get more interactive but we’re not quite there yet… twitter is still too hard for the beginning teacher to participate in I feel like – although sites like participate.com and Tweetdeck go a long way towards organizing the constant flow of content to make things more workable.

In conclusion, Communication is probably the most invested-in concept of our generation, so it’s going to be amazing to see how those investments change the fundamental nature of our human interaction in the coming years!

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